bird photography : yellow-rumped warbler

On a recent trip to visit John's parents in West Virginia, John spotted a bird with a bright yellow tail patch that neither he nor Beth could identify immediately, and unfortunately, John had not been able to get a good photograph of the bird, either.  Beth's friend Adam quickly ID's the bird as a Yellow-Rumped Warbler, the most common warbler seen in the US, and on a subsequent trip to Huntley Meadows, John and Beth found an entire flock of the tiny birds flitting around a clearing--leaving the two to wonder how they'd missed seeing this beautiful bird before.
On a recent trip to visit John's parents in West Virginia, John spotted a bird with a bright yellow tail patch that neither he nor Beth could identify immediately, and unfortunately, John had not been able to get a good photograph of the bird, either. Beth's friend Adam quickly ID's the bird as a Yellow-Rumped Warbler, the most common warbler seen in the US, and on a subsequent trip to Huntley Meadows, John and Beth found an entire flock of the tiny birds flitting around a clearing--leaving the two to wonder how they'd missed seeing this beautiful bird before.
Equipment:Canon EOS DIGITAL REBEL XT
Canon EF 300mm f4L IS with 1.4x Teleconverter
Settings:f8; 1/100 sec.; focal length at 420 mm; ISO 200
Date:March 20, 2006 2:49 pm
Location:Huntley Meadows Park / Fairfax County, VA
Photography Notes:
The rule for shutter speeds when handholding dictates that the speed should be no lower than the reciprocal of the lens' focal length, and even with the two-stop benefit of the lens' image stabilization, the 1/100th of a second used here would seem a bit low. However, John had time to set up his camera's tripod, making shutter-speed sharpness concerns largely moot.
 



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